Give

Kennesaw State University preparing Children’s Home nomination to National Register of Historic Places

For over 144 years, The United Methodist Children’s Home has served the evolving needs of children and their families across north Georgia. The institution has an integral place in history for both the city of Decatur and also for Georgia.

 

A Kennesaw State University class is working to help acknowledge and preserve this rich history by preparing a nomination for The Children’s Home to be on the National Register of Historic Places.

Children’s Home residents were taught on campus until 1951, when they were bused to Dekalb County schools.

Children’s Home residents were taught on campus until 1951, when they were bused to DeKalb County schools.

 

 

“The Children’s Home has been such an important part of this community’s history and that’s something that should be formally recognized,” said Dr. Jennifer Dickey, KSU Public History Program coordinator. “It’s a beautiful place and much of its history, at least its 20th-century history, can still be read on the landscape through the buildings and structures that still exist.”

 

The project is a continuation of a partnership between The Children’s Home and KSU that began in fall 2014 with a class that conducted oral histories of Children’s Home alum that offer insights into the history of the institution. The oral histories are housed with artifacts at Emory University’s Pitts Theology Library.

 

“I see lots of possibilities for continued collaboration between our organizations in ways that will provide KSU students with hands-on experience and help The Children’s Home preserve and interpret its history,” said Dickey.

The Children’s Home began foster care services in 1973, which reflected a shift nationally in the philosophy on how to best help children. No longer did war and disease orphan many children. They were more likely to be removed from a dysfunctional or abusive home and in need of temporary care.

The Children’s Home began foster care services in 1973, which reflected a shift nationally in the philosophy on how to best help children. No longer did war and disease orphan many children. They were more likely to be removed from a dysfunctional or abusive home and in need of temporary care.

 

Click on the thumbnail below to see a timeline of key Children’s Home events

Timeline

 

STAY UP TO DATE

Stay connected with The Children's Home